General 425 or 44 or 42? So many good Moodys

David Mcauley

David Mcauley
Temporary Member
Hi! I'm swapping life on the canal for life on the sea, Moody CC boats have been top of my list since investigating yachts and yachting...mainly due to layout and the large aft cabin.

My intention is to liveaboard but also continuously sail. Ideally I'd go around the UK and the the med, but may well go across the Atlantic and further in years to come. I'm therefore looking for many things in a yacht inc sizeable for liveaboard and potentially 1 or 2 crew occasionally, happy/practical in the med, and safe at sea.

Ideally I don't want to buy a med boat then sell it in a couple of years to buy something deemed more sturdy, to go further afield.

So I'm looking for your thoughts, advice, experiences on the 425, 44 and 42...and maybe the 38 although i feel it may be a bit small. I note the 42 has 30% ballast as opposed to nearer 40% of the other boats, does this make it more a med cruiser or does it have an ocean going reputation like the 425 and 44?

As I'll be singlehanded a fair amount of time I'm looking for in-mast furling, all lines led back to cockpit, self tailing winches and a bow thruster. Should there be anything else on my list?

Many thanks

David
 

Peter Wright

Peter Wright
Member
Boat name
WILD THYME
Berth
Suffolk Yacht Harbour
Boat type
Moody 425
Cruising area
North Sea, English Channel, Biscay
Hi David,

All three of these Moodys have good pedigree as ocean cruisers, but the best of the pack is undoubtedly the 44. In general they're a bit more pricey than the other two, but second hand yacht prices, particularly for bigger yachts have been fairly low since about 2010, so you can pick up a 44 at a reasonable price nowadays. The key downside of the 44 is higher berthing fees.

The 42 is newer than the 44 which is, in turn, newer than the 425, and all have slightly different hull forms.

They were all sold as standard with in mast furling and self tailing genoa winches. On the 425, the halyard winches (at ghe mast) and the two small winches for the main sheet were not self tailing. In all cases, although the deck moulding has plinths for spinnaker sheet winches, the spi winches themselves were either an optional extra or fitted later by the owner.

I don't believe any of them came with a bow thruster as original equipment, but many have had them fitted subsequently.

The 425 has a more traditional double panel masthead rig, with fore and aft lower shrouds then cap and intermediate shrouds set square athwartships. The 2 more modern ones have swept back spreaders, which allows a slightly finer sheeting angle for the genoa, so they should be slightly closer winded, at the cost of more mainsail chafe on the spreaders when sailing well off the wind.

Handicaps show the 44 to be the quickest of the three, followed by the 425 then the 42. In cruising terms, they all will make fast passages, but none of them have much success in round the cans racing. For proper off shore racing, they can succeed provided the wind blows - they all need at least 10 knots of breeze to come alive.

For ocean crossing, you will need gear that was not supplied with the boat originally, but may well have been fitted subsequently. This applies to all ptoduction yachts. At the age of these yachts, most of the electronics will be due for a refit of it has been done already. The state of the engine, like the whole boat, will depend on how well it has been looked after.

Peter.
 

Peter Sims

Peter Sims
Member
Boat name
SIRI
Berth
Lefkas Marina
Boat type
Moody 44 (90s)
Cruising area
Ionian
Hi David
I have to agree with everything Peter said, especially about the 44 being the best. No bias I promise!
The most important addition to a standard type of boat, with your plans in mind, would be good electrical power systems. Top of the list is adding solar panels sufficient to meet all your needs, then adding extra batteries and finally reducing electrical demand wherever possible. LED lights throughout make a big difference and also a keel cooler for the fridge. Everything else depends on the condition of the boat you buy. I was fortunate in buying one of the last 44's built that had also had a major refit recently so all equipment was in very good condition.
I don't think you should rule out a 38 as they have a very good reputation too.
Regards
Peter
 
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