Moody 47 (80s) Main sail furling external to mast

Robert Thomson

Robert Thomson
Temporary Member
Is anyone aware of Moody fitting mainsail furling systems which were external to the mast rather than internal ?
I am aware of the likes of Factor doing these as aftermarket options, but haven't heard about this system as original equipment.
Were any 80's 47/471/marksman fitted with a conventional main?
Any insights advice etc appreciated.
 

Peter Wright

Peter Wright
Member
Boat name
WILD THYME
Berth
Suffolk Yacht Harbour
Boat type
Moody 425
Cruising area
North Sea, English Channel, Biscay
Hi Robert,

Welcome to the MOA. This has sat a couple of days without answer, so I'll have a go. Hopefully someone who knows more about M47s will be along soon.

The Moody 47 was effectively a semi custom built boat, so it would have been supplied originally with any features the original purchasers specified (and priced accordingly). However, I very much doubt that any customer wanting in-mast furling would have specified a bolt on after market system in preference to the standard Kemp/Selden arrangement - it doesn't make sense.

I can imagine that an original buyer might have specified a conventional slab reefing main, which I'm sure Moody would have been happy to supply, but I don't know of any such boats.

Peter.
 

Robert Thomson

Robert Thomson
Temporary Member
Peter
Thank you for your helpful reply, I have managed to find a rigger who seemed to know a little about them and almost certainly they were retrofitted as you said. It would seem the original spec was for a conventional main and reverting to that would not be to expensive. The rigger did comment this system has less prevalence to jam as opposed to 'real' inmast systems and you can see any potential issues developing. I did find a photo online of a 471 called Lazy Life which also seemed to have a similar system installed, but picture was not very clear. It had been for sale with iNautia. Thanks again for your help.
 

Peter Wright

Peter Wright
Member
Boat name
WILD THYME
Berth
Suffolk Yacht Harbour
Boat type
Moody 425
Cruising area
North Sea, English Channel, Biscay
Hi Robert,

I would disagree with your rigger's view that aftermarket furlers are less likely to jam than those built into the mast.

There clearly is a risk of a jam but, in my experience, this happens on systems that are badly set up or have been left year after year with no maintenance. The other common cause is a mainsail blown to the shape of an old pillowcase.

Basically, if you get a fold in the cloth as it enters the furler, there's a good chance it will jam. If it does, the worst option is to keep pulling - best to unfurl, check you've got the boom angle right and start again. This applies to all in-mast or behind the mast furlers.

The big downside of the after market type is the additional weight aloft, making the boat roll more. In a furling mast, the same alloy extrusion serves the purpose of mast structure and furler casing, saving the weight of the furler casing over the after market type.

I have to say I have never seen an after market furler built on to a furling mast, even at Selden prices, I imagine a complete rebuild of the original furler with new parts would be cheaper and better.

Peter.
 
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Robert Thomson

Robert Thomson
Temporary Member
Peter
Thanks for your reply. I concur that good maintenance and decent sails will help prevent jams. In the case of the system I'm looking at it was fitted to what seems to be a mast for a conventional main and oddly it has no covering extrusions, which helps with the weight, but opens up new issues such as UV affecting the rolled sail.
If I want this boat it seems like sticking with this system or taking it off and reverting to a conventional main. Or I suppose fitting a new furling mast. The rigging needs changed on current mast in any case so if I go for this the piggy bank is in for a few blustery days !
Thanks again for your help.
Robert
 
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