Moody 27 Moody 27 or 28

Liz Witney

Liz Witney
Registered Guest
Hello Moody owners
I'm thinking of buying a small Moody - 27 or 28. I sail mostly single handed and looking for an easy to handle boat. Both the 27 and 28 seem really suitable - does anyone have any advice?
 

Pete Rowland

Peter Rowland
Member
Boat name
APRIL LASS
Berth
Gosport
Boat type
Moody 31 MkII
Cruising area
Solent
Liz, welcome to the MOA. There is another thread running on the same sized yachts, so worth reading that as well. Owning a M31 I would choose the M28. The main difference between the M31 and M28 seems to be the loss of the lockers in the fore cabin, the small cupboard in the galley and a different arrangement in the heads. Actually I prefer the M28 heads layout. I would have no qualms about the lack of lockers in the fore cabin or the small cabinet in the galley. The sugar scoop on the stern of the M28 will be invaluable to get in and out of a dinghy, great if you prefer little harbours and anchoring in quiet bays rather than marinas. The window in the M28 stern cabin a nice touch for ventilation, its missing in the M31 sadly.

Whilst the M28 is lighter than the M31, I don't think you will have any problems single handing a yacht this size. You will however need a really good autopilot that can be relied on. The new Evo100 from Raymarine is impressive and if there is the money left over after purchase I would spend it here as they are a step change over the older tiller pilots. Sailing solo you need that third hand to put up sails, check the chart or make tea on passage and finally take the strain on a long trip so you can concentrate on looking out and enjoying life.

The same will apply to the M27 and there are a few on the market at the moment. Good luck and do come back if there is something specific you are not sure about.

Pete
 

Liz Witney

Liz Witney
Registered Guest
Liz, welcome to the MOA. There is another thread running on the same sized yachts, so worth reading that as well. Owning a M31 I would choose the M28. The main difference between the M31 and M28 seems to be the loss of the lockers in the fore cabin, the small cupboard in the galley and a different arrangement in the heads. Actually I prefer the M28 heads layout. I would have no qualms about the lack of lockers in the fore cabin or the small cabinet in the galley. The sugar scoop on the stern of the M28 will be invaluable to get in and out of a dinghy, great if you prefer little harbours and anchoring in quiet bays rather than marinas. The window in the M28 stern cabin a nice touch for ventilation, its missing in the M31 sadly.

Whilst the M28 is lighter than the M31, I don't think you will have any problems single handing a yacht this size. You will however need a really good autopilot that can be relied on. The new Evo100 from Raymarine is impressive and if there is the money left over after purchase I would spend it here as they are a step change over the older tiller pilots. Sailing solo you need that third hand to put up sails, check the chart or make tea on passage and finally take the strain on a long trip so you can concentrate on looking out and enjoying life.

The same will apply to the M27 and there are a few on the market at the moment. Good luck and do come back if there is something specific you are not sure about.

Pete
Hi Pete - thank you for your reply - lots of useful information. I think you are saying that the 28 is a better boat than the 27 - if the cash difference isn't an issue! I can go to a 28, I'm just not sure the extra cash gets that much better boat? Certainly the chart table is better on the 28 and you recco the sugar scoop stern - I can see that could be good. Also makes a different rudder configuration - not sure which is better. An issue is that there aren't many 28s available and lots of 27s. I guess less were made. Thank you anyway and if you have anything more to add, that would be appreciated.
Liz
 

Pete Rowland

Peter Rowland
Member
Boat name
APRIL LASS
Berth
Gosport
Boat type
Moody 31 MkII
Cruising area
Solent
I think the reason there aren't many M28s is that folk when buying new, probably chose the slightly larger M31 instead. There was a M28 in Portland for sale last summer for about £20k. Is an offer on these outside of the budget?

https://yachts.apolloduck.co.uk/boat/moody-31-mki/321570


If so, then the M27s in Southampton are interesting, one has a new engine which would be very tempting for the price, the other new cushions and cooker, which won't have been cheap plus self tailing winches which will be useful for single handing.

The other option might be a Moody 30: https://www.yachtworld.co.uk/boats/1978/moody-30-3608710/ The difference will be a higher cruising speed due to the longer water length, smoother motion at sea and much greater volume inside. How about this: https://www.yachtworld.co.uk/boats/1977/moody-30-3463284/ which has been re-engined.

I wouldn't be put off sailing a 30ft yacht single handed. The extra weight means they are more stable and have a greater tendency to stay put when you stop. Useful when coming along side. Other techniques like an autopilot and having a mid ship rope to secure first to a pontoon makes life easier too.

Pete
 
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Liz Witney

Liz Witney
Registered Guest
I think the reason there aren't many M28s is that folk when buying new, probably chose the slightly larger M31 instead. There was a M28 in Portland for sale last summer for about £20k. Is an offer on these outside of the budget?

https://yachts.apolloduck.co.uk/boat/moody-31-mki/321570


If so, then the M27s in Southampton are interesting, one has a new engine which would be very tempting for the price, the other new cushions and cooker, which won't have been cheap plus self tailing winches which will be useful for single handing.

The other option might be a Moody 30: https://www.yachtworld.co.uk/boats/1978/moody-30-3608710/ The difference will be a higher cruising speed due to the longer water length, smoother motion at sea and much greater volume inside. How about this: https://www.yachtworld.co.uk/boats/1977/moody-30-3463284/ which has been re-engined.

I wouldn't be put off sailing a 30ft yacht single handed. The extra weight means they are more stable and have a greater tendency to stay put when you stop. Useful when coming along side. Other techniques like an autopilot and having a mid ship rope to secure first to a pontoon makes life easier too.

Pete
Tks for the info Pete. I do think the M30 is too dated - I really like the aft heads on the later models. I'm after a BK boat, ideally a 28 which I think I can handle better than a 31 - although your view on single handing a 31 would be appreciated. I would want to put a windlass on whatever boat I get - and other aids to sailing for the older skipper! Certainly take on board your comments on autopilot and self tail winches. I'm on the East Coast and there is a 27 for sale with recent engine and full osmosis treatment - on at £17950 with boat shed Suffolk - if you've got time to look..... I do prefer the 28 with a chart table and it may well be better to wait for one or consider the 31. I'm planning to eventually spend some time aboard, so space could be useful for crew as well.
Liz
 

Pete Rowland

Peter Rowland
Member
Boat name
APRIL LASS
Berth
Gosport
Boat type
Moody 31 MkII
Cruising area
Solent
Liz, given the information in your last couple of sentences I think you should hold out for a M31. The 31 Mk 1s are now coming into budget and likely to have self tailing winches and a windlass as standard. The Mk2 sugar scoop is great but could be replicated with a bathing platform on a Mk 1 quite easily. If that means buying on the other side of the country and moving it, well so be it. That is what hired skippers and friends are for.

Fist off some light reading. How about this thread were two old blokes took a M31 from Cardiff to New York http://cardiffyachtclub.proboards.com/thread/1776/moody-old-blokes. Then post 2 in this thread: https://www.sailnet.com/forums/boat-review-purchase-forum/8704-moody-31-more-questions.html How did that Moody get to the Caribbean?

In terms of single handing, 5 years ago my wife changed jobs and couldn't get the time off for our annual holidays. So I got a leave pass to go solo sailing for a fortnight. I went from the Solent down to Dartmouth and back stopping in between. Initially I was quite concerned about sailing single handed, especially crossing Lyme Bay as you can't normally see land for some hours in the middle. SWMBO doesn't really sail despite the pair of us having crossed the Channel or down to the West Country regularly for a decade. So I guess I was single handing anyway, but being on your own is an interesting challenge.

After a couple of days I relaxed more even reading a book at sea. This is were the autopilot comes in to take the stress and hard work out of a long trip. Allows you to even cook at sea whilst popping up every couple of minutes to see what is going on. On another solo trip I even managed to spend an afternoon flying the cruising chute down the length western Solent for the first time. Its a big sail and needs quite a bit of foredeck work to set it up then down again because it had a twist before finally flying, but the M31 gave me a nice flat stable deck to do this from. Moving around a harbour isn't a problem solo, the boat is stable and tends to stay were its put a least for a while. Sure the view from the back of the stern cabin looking forward makes it look huge and when antifouling it is huge, but also stable to walk around, good news when we get older.

I think you will find that the M31 is two tonnes heavier than a M27 so will provide a much more stable platform for moving around on, all be it clipped on whilst at sea. In harbour it will also offer much more accommodation for you and occasional guests. This is quite important if you plan on living on board for a while. Its not just the length but height and width which helps avoid that cabin fever feeling.

It is also quite doable to cross to Holland and Belgium which are popular destinations for Moody owners and given a half decent forecast, so no reason why you shouldn't follow a well trodden path from other smaller Moodys over the years.

Want a challenge? a Moody 31 with bilge keels did the Midi canal in 2004. I want to do that in ours, just need to retire first. Ruby Rose on You Tube have just done a great series on the Midi in their Southerly 38.

I think you should go and view the M27 and then blag your way onto a M31 to see the difference. You could also charter one with some friends: https://www.alba-sailing.co.uk/yachts/true-blue/

Having written the above, I now wonder if I have done the right thing in recommending a M31. If your heart is set on a M27 then ignore the above and let the heart rule. You need that fond "look back" feeling as you row away from your yacht.

Pete
 

Simon Hale

Simon Hale
Member
Boat name
BARLEY WINE
Berth
Gosport
Boat type
Moody 30
Cruising area
Solent
Hi Liz, I note you are looking at the 27 or 28 but Pete Rowland has mentioned a Moody 30 I thought I would add my opinion. I have a Moody 30 which I sail with my wife. Fantastically stable and a really lovely boat. As you are already confident sailing singlehanded, it is well worth a look. You are welcome to come aboard mine at a mutually convenient time or I’m happy to answer any questions. I’m moored in Gosport.
 

Liz Witney

Liz Witney
Registered Guest
Liz, given the information in your last couple of sentences I think you should hold out for a M31. The 31 Mk 1s are now coming into budget and likely to have self tailing winches and a windlass as standard. The Mk2 sugar scoop is great but could be replicated with a bathing platform on a Mk 1 quite easily. If that means buying on the other side of the country and moving it, well so be it. That is what hired skippers and friends are for.

Fist off some light reading. How about this thread were two old blokes took a M31 from Cardiff to New York http://cardiffyachtclub.proboards.com/thread/1776/moody-old-blokes. Then post 2 in this thread: https://www.sailnet.com/forums/boat-review-purchase-forum/8704-moody-31-more-questions.html How did that Moody get to the Caribbean?

In terms of single handing, 5 years ago my wife changed jobs and couldn't get the time off for our annual holidays. So I got a leave pass to go solo sailing for a fortnight. I went from the Solent down to Dartmouth and back stopping in between. Initially I was quite concerned about sailing single handed, especially crossing Lyme Bay as you can't normally see land for some hours in the middle. SWMBO doesn't really sail despite the pair of us having crossed the Channel or down to the West Country regularly for a decade. So I guess I was single handing anyway, but being on your own is an interesting challenge.

After a couple of days I relaxed more even reading a book at sea. This is were the autopilot comes in to take the stress and hard work out of a long trip. Allows you to even cook at sea whilst popping up every couple of minutes to see what is going on. On another solo trip I even managed to spend an afternoon flying the cruising chute down the length western Solent for the first time. Its a big sail and needs quite a bit of foredeck work to set it up then down again because it had a twist before finally flying, but the M31 gave me a nice flat stable deck to do this from. Moving around a harbour isn't a problem solo, the boat is stable and tends to stay were its put a least for a while. Sure the view from the back of the stern cabin looking forward makes it look huge and when antifouling it is huge, but also stable to walk around, good news when we get older.

I think you will find that the M31 is two tonnes heavier than a M27 so will provide a much more stable platform for moving around on, all be it clipped on whilst at sea. In harbour it will also offer much more accommodation for you and occasional guests. This is quite important if you plan on living on board for a while. Its not just the length but height and width which helps avoid that cabin fever feeling.

It is also quite doable to cross to Holland and Belgium which are popular destinations for Moody owners and given a half decent forecast, so no reason why you shouldn't follow a well trodden path from other smaller Moodys over the years.

Want a challenge? a Moody 31 with bilge keels did the Midi canal in 2004. I want to do that in ours, just need to retire first. Ruby Rose on You Tube have just done a great series on the Midi in their Southerly 38.

I think you should go and view the M27 and then blag your way onto a M31 to see the difference. You could also charter one with some friends: https://www.alba-sailing.co.uk/yachts/true-blue/

Having written the above, I now wonder if I have done the right thing in recommending a M31. If your heart is set on a M27 then ignore the above and let the heart rule. You need that fond "look back" feeling as you row away from your yacht.

Pete
Liz, given the information in your last couple of sentences I think you should hold out for a M31. The 31 Mk 1s are now coming into budget and likely to have self tailing winches and a windlass as standard. The Mk2 sugar scoop is great but could be replicated with a bathing platform on a Mk 1 quite easily. If that means buying on the other side of the country and moving it, well so be it. That is what hired skippers and friends are for.

Fist off some light reading. How about this thread were two old blokes took a M31 from Cardiff to New York http://cardiffyachtclub.proboards.com/thread/1776/moody-old-blokes. Then post 2 in this thread: https://www.sailnet.com/forums/boat-review-purchase-forum/8704-moody-31-more-questions.html How did that Moody get to the Caribbean?

In terms of single handing, 5 years ago my wife changed jobs and couldn't get the time off for our annual holidays. So I got a leave pass to go solo sailing for a fortnight. I went from the Solent down to Dartmouth and back stopping in between. Initially I was quite concerned about sailing single handed, especially crossing Lyme Bay as you can't normally see land for some hours in the middle. SWMBO doesn't really sail despite the pair of us having crossed the Channel or down to the West Country regularly for a decade. So I guess I was single handing anyway, but being on your own is an interesting challenge.

After a couple of days I relaxed more even reading a book at sea. This is were the autopilot comes in to take the stress and hard work out of a long trip. Allows you to even cook at sea whilst popping up every couple of minutes to see what is going on. On another solo trip I even managed to spend an afternoon flying the cruising chute down the length western Solent for the first time. Its a big sail and needs quite a bit of foredeck work to set it up then down again because it had a twist before finally flying, but the M31 gave me a nice flat stable deck to do this from. Moving around a harbour isn't a problem solo, the boat is stable and tends to stay were its put a least for a while. Sure the view from the back of the stern cabin looking forward makes it look huge and when antifouling it is huge, but also stable to walk around, good news when we get older.

I think you will find that the M31 is two tonnes heavier than a M27 so will provide a much more stable platform for moving around on, all be it clipped on whilst at sea. In harbour it will also offer much more accommodation for you and occasional guests. This is quite important if you plan on living on board for a while. Its not just the length but height and width which helps avoid that cabin fever feeling.

It is also quite doable to cross to Holland and Belgium which are popular destinations for Moody owners and given a half decent forecast, so no reason why you shouldn't follow a well trodden path from other smaller Moodys over the years.

Want a challenge? a Moody 31 with bilge keels did the Midi canal in 2004. I want to do that in ours, just need to retire first. Ruby Rose on You Tube have just done a great series on the Midi in their Southerly 38.

I think you should go and view the M27 and then blag your way onto a M31 to see the difference. You could also charter one with some friends: https://www.alba-sailing.co.uk/yachts/true-blue/

Having written the above, I now wonder if I have done the right thing in recommending a M31. If your heart is set on a M27 then ignore the above and let the heart rule. You need that fond "look back" feeling as you row away from your yacht.

Pete
Thanks Pete - such good comments and thoughts. I'm going to think about the M31 now - more seriously!
The various articles are interesting - if I don't make a purchase maybe chartering is a good start!
 

Liz Witney

Liz Witney
Registered Guest
Hi Liz, I note you are looking at the 27 or 28 but Pete Rowland has mentioned a Moody 30 I thought I would add my opinion. I have a Moody 30 which I sail with my wife. Fantastically stable and a really lovely boat. As you are already confident sailing singlehanded, it is well worth a look. You are welcome to come aboard mine at a mutually convenient time or I’m happy to answer any questions. I’m moored in Gosport.
Hi Simon - thank you for your reply. I've thought the M30 is looking it's age - no disrespect meant to your beauty! And I'm keen on an aft heads - maybe should think again!
I like your assumption that I'm a confident singlehanded - actually I'm one part of a sailing partnership and sadly my husband now out of it - so this is a new project alone. I bought a Hunter Channel 27 and sold it all in one season because it was just too headstrong and felt unbalanced. I'm hoping the Moody brand will work better for me.
Appreciate your offer - thank you. Liz
 

Barry Voysey

Barry Voysey
Member
Boat name
LIONA
Berth
Birdham Pool
Boat type
Moody 336
Cruising area
Solent
If you haven't already seen it, there is a short piece in the most recent practical boat owner on the merits of the 27 and 28.
 

Adam Grater

Adam Grater
Member
Boat name
CORNSILK
Berth
Oare Creek
Boat type
Moody S31
Cruising area
Uk and France
We looked at 27 & 28, settled on the 28. Felt that the extra cost (and wait) was justified - slightly newer boat, better storage and tardis like layout etc.
The 28 is a stable yacht, sails well and is pretty forgiving (handy in our case).
Ours was a fin but we had friends with a b/k and they seemed quite similar in performance.
As with any 80's boat there is going to be a bunch of maintenance required, and maybe some updating. I'd go for a sorted example of either 28 or 27, rather than a 'project' - unless you like spending time contorting yourself into very small spaces.
Lots of info on the 28 on this site.
Good luck, Adam
 

Liz Witney

Liz Witney
Registered Guest
We looked at 27 & 28, settled on the 28. Felt that the extra cost (and wait) was justified - slightly newer boat, better storage and tardis like layout etc.
The 28 is a stable yacht, sails well and is pretty forgiving (handy in our case).
Ours was a fin but we had friends with a b/k and they seemed quite similar in performance.
As with any 80's boat there is going to be a bunch of maintenance required, and maybe some updating. I'd go for a sorted example of either 28 or 27, rather than a 'project' - unless you like spending time contorting yourself into very small spaces.
Lots of info on the 28 on this site.
Good luck, Adam
Thank you for your input Adam. I agree about finding a sorted out example! I'm definitely not good at doing stuff myself. The 27 I'm interested in does have a updated engine and has had osmosis treatment, but probably still lots to do. I have a question - as you'll be familiar with both the 27 & 28, could you advise if the cockpit is significantly deeper on the 27 as it doesn't have the large aft cabin? I also agree the 28 is a better layout and bigger design if not in length, there just aren't any for sale! Best wishes, Liz
 

Adam Grater

Adam Grater
Member
Boat name
CORNSILK
Berth
Oare Creek
Boat type
Moody S31
Cruising area
Uk and France
I can't remember the 27's but the locker on the 28' is full depth - behind the heads - goes right to the bottom of the boat, pretty spacious holds dingy, warps etc etc ......
IMG_6204.jpg
see pic
 

Liz Witney

Liz Witney
Registered Guest
I can't remember the 27's but the locker on the 28' is full depth - behind the heads - goes right to the bottom of the boat, pretty spacious holds dingy, warps etc etc ...... View attachment 16572see pic
That is a huge space!
It seems you now have the S31? Versus the 28 it is considerably bigger with bigger rig - was that a big up or is she easy to manage? Just wondering about singlehanding on an S31.
 

Adam Grater

Adam Grater
Member
Boat name
CORNSILK
Berth
Oare Creek
Boat type
Moody S31
Cruising area
Uk and France
28 to 31 was ok for us, but we are not that experienced and I feel that bigger might have been tricky - depends on the circumstances I guess.
Being a saildrive the S31 is easier to park, the shaft driven 28' has an alarming degree of propwalk to s/board when starting to go astern, but you do get used to it and it can be useful.
No reason you couldn't single hand on an S31 if you are confidant (and experienced).
I could fool around with the genoa sheets on the 28, I can't on the 31.
 

Liz Witney

Liz Witney
Registered Guest
28 to 31 was ok for us, but we are not that experienced and I feel that bigger might have been tricky - depends on the circumstances I guess.
Being a saildrive the S31 is easier to park, the shaft driven 28' has an alarming degree of propwalk to s/board when starting to go astern, but you do get used to it and it can be useful.
No reason you couldn't single hand on an S31 if you are confidant (and experienced).
I could fool around with the genoa sheets on the 28, I can't on the 31.
Thanks for your useful help Adam.
 

Peter Wright

Peter Wright
Member
Boat name
WILD THYME
Berth
Suffolk Yacht Harbour
Boat type
Moody 425
Cruising area
North Sea, English Channel, Biscay
Hi Liz,

I wouldn't be too concerned about size for single handing - whatever size of boat, it's all about taking your time and preparing properly for whatever you're about to do. The 2 most challenging things when single handed are picking up a mooring and coming alongside in a marina and I don't find that size affects either of those operations - in some ways, a bigger boat having more in the water and being less blown by the wind helps, because both those operations are a doddle in a calm and tricky in a gale. The difference between 27 and 31 foot for these operations is negligible imho.

Peter.
 

Liz Witney

Liz Witney
Registered Guest
Hi Liz,

I wouldn't be too concerned about size for single handing - whatever size of boat, it's all about taking your time and preparing properly for whatever you're about to do. The 2 most challenging things when single handed are picking up a mooring and coming alongside in a marina and I don't find that size affects either of those operations - in some ways, a bigger boat having more in the water and being less blown by the wind helps, because both those operations are a doddle in a calm and tricky in a gale. The difference between 27 and 31 foot for these operations is negligible imho.

Peter.
Thank you for this Peter - good advice and an encouraging message! However the sail area is distinctly bigger... I'm not sure if the 31 is moderately canvassed for her size or not. Hey ho...
I see you are in SYH - that's the marina I may request a berth at - that is as and when I get a boat! Are you happy with it?
Liz
 

Peter Wright

Peter Wright
Member
Boat name
WILD THYME
Berth
Suffolk Yacht Harbour
Boat type
Moody 425
Cruising area
North Sea, English Channel, Biscay
Hi Liz,

Yes, very happy, but perhaps better if I explain by PM.

Peter.
 

Peter Wright

Peter Wright
Member
Boat name
WILD THYME
Berth
Suffolk Yacht Harbour
Boat type
Moody 425
Cruising area
North Sea, English Channel, Biscay
Hi Liz,

More sail area is generally matched by more powerful sail handling gear. Apart from beginning / end of season, you don't have to lift whole sails these days - genoas roll up and you get bigger winches for bigger sails. Even on big racers, there's rarely more than one gorilla winding the winch. Get over 40 foot, and the mainsails on most cruisers wind away in the mast. With a decent autopilot, sailing single handed isn't a challenge on our Moody425, compared with picking up a mooring or berthing.

In the late '60s / early '70s Bob Robers was still trading his sailing barge Cambria loading 160 tons of cargo. It wasn't unusual for a Mate to let him down. In these circumstances, he sought the help of any young man cluttering up the Pin Mill foreshore, but if he found no-one, he put to sea effectively single handed with just his dog to help. Both he and the barge survived to his retirement and, although Bob is now sadly gone, Cambria is still sailing.

Peter.
 

Steve Howlett

Steve Howlett
Member
Boat name
TIGGER
Berth
Great Wakering, Essex
Boat type
Moody 27
Cruising area
River Crouch / River Roach / Thames Estuary
Hi Liz,
I purchased my 27 Tigger at the end of 2017 season and for a very reasonable sum in comparison to what some are asking today.

Although mine is a 1985 built and spec, the only difference I frequently see is that mine has a different navigation table than most I’ve seen, it is part of the cabinetry and is folded up very neatly.

Since owning, I have installed an electric windlass, and have a host of modern electric kit to install - not in a rush as even though most of the kit is rather old, it is still up-to-date and functional, and have not yet spent the maintenance figures I had in mind. They are very easy to work on, and even the engine servicing is straightforward after having had a course and done some research.

I was very surprised how stable she is in comparison to other 27ft sailboats that I’ve sailed on and walking around the deck doesn’t give any significant ‘roll’, and find her to be very confidence inspiring for that fact - must be the beam and the weight that gives her a ‘big boat’ feel - and having been caught in a couple of bigger seas and conditions than I’d have liked, she still performs admirably well giving excellent feedback through the tiller, and very quick and manoeuvrable whilst within marinas and coming in to dock.

Having seen the sugar scoop of the 28 after having bought my 27, I feel that would likely be the only aspect I’d want to change - just for the summer where it would be nicer for swimming etc., but for the added asking prices, I really wouldn’t personally have wanted to go down that route.

Although my better half and I are usually sailing Tigger together, I have singlehanded a handful of times, and found her to be very simple to handle, and as long as some passage planning and setting things up accordingly in advance, even docking, anchoring and picking up a mooring is not overly stressful solo - the only thing I personally find a niggle with is that the mainsheet and traveller is forward of the jib sheets position, and occasionally it can be inconvenient to work around each other whilst tacking, and a bit of creativity needs to be taken when singlehanded, but being that the rig has a rather short boom, that is the hand we are dealt.
Personally I think I have bought the right size boat for us now, and not finding myself looking for that ‘bigger boat’

104006EB-929F-4238-ADF1-D6F02AE68745.jpeg
 

Pete Rowland

Peter Rowland
Member
Boat name
APRIL LASS
Berth
Gosport
Boat type
Moody 31 MkII
Cruising area
Solent
Liz,

There is a Facebook Group called "Sitting there rotting in a boatyard". Its a closed group but easy enough to join. Half way down their page on 27 Dec 19, Brian Marshall said he has refurbished an ex charter M28 and plans to sell it in the New Year, like now. She is up north on the Caley Canal. Over to you:

M28.jpg
 
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