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  1. Ian Andrews

    Ian Andrews Ian Andrews Registered Guest

    Messages:
    2
    Hi, I am going to look at a fin keeled Moody 28 tomorrow. I have had a good look around the internet but haven't found very much information on them. I read on Yachtsnet that they were built between 1985 and 1987 however i have seen elsewhere that the mark 2 was built in 1988. Does anyone know the difference between the mark 1 & 2 and how long the 2 was in production for? Are there any inherant issues with these boats that I should look out for? They are also considerably more expensive than a Moody 27. Does anyone have an opinion as to whether they are worth the extra money?

    Thanks in advance

    Ian
     
  2. Dick Holness

    Dick Holness Dick Holness

    Messages:
    3,971
    Boat name:
    CANTATA
    Berth:
    Swale Marina, Kent
    Boat type:
    Moody 36(90s)
    Cruising area:
    East Coast France Belgium Holland
    I'd not heard of two Marks of the 28, Ian. According to the Moody records they were built from Dec 1985 to June 1987, with 70 boats built.
    I've never sailed one but friends had one some years ago. I always thought it looked a really nice boat and it certainly sailed very well.
    There was one for sale via the MOA website back in February, I don't know if it sold or not - http://moodyowners.info/threads/good-example-of-moody-28-for-sale.14338/
    Good luck.
     
  3. Adam Grater

    Adam Grater Adam Grater

    Messages:
    184
    Boat name:
    CORNSILK
    Berth:
    Oare Creek
    Boat type:
    Moody S31
    Cruising area:
    Uk and France
    I had a 28 fin for 9 years - a lovely boat with a pretty decent aft cabin, a forward facing nav table and, for a 28', reasonable storage. A stiff little yacht that sails very well indeed. The down side is that you have to learn a kind of body language down below as its all very tight with a couple of people moving about on board. I'm just under 6' and had to stoop. Up side is less anti-foul, lower mooring fees - that's boats for you.
    From my experience the main thing to look at is the fuel tank - the original was mild steel and will likely start leaking soon, if not already changed. Easy enough to do yourself, companies like Tek Tanks have moulds. Electrics are getting old, as is the engine, the VP2002 is a bit of a reluctant starter although ours seemed pretty bomb proof and never let us down. Should be fairly obvious if it's been neglected.

    She steers fairly wildly to starboard in reverse, does about 5knts forward ..... with a clean hull.
    A volvo shaft seal is a good investment.

    Very good starter yacht, and a bit nicer than the 27 (just my opinion, looked at both).

    Best of luck
     
  4. Ian Andrews

    Ian Andrews Ian Andrews Registered Guest

    Messages:
    2
    Thanks for the replies. I currently have an Albin Vega and was looking for something about the same size but with a bit more comfort. Ideally something with a bit more control in reverse too so interested to hear that it is "fairly wild". It can't be worse than a Vega, surely! From a space point of view I will largely be single handed and as I am 5' 6" headroom shouldn't be an issue. The engine is a Yanmar so I assume not the original? Interesting about the fuel tank, I will make a point of checking that.

    All the best

    Ian
     
  5. Colin Shead

    Colin Shead Colin Shead

    Messages:
    540
    Boat name:
    TOODLE PIP
    Berth:
    Tollesbury Marina
    Boat type:
    Moody 28
    Cruising area:
    Southern North Sea
    Hi Ian

    There is only one mark of M28. I have had Toodle Pip a twin keel M28 for 13 years, she is by far the best yacht I have ever owned (in 50 years experience! ). She is a perfect size for a couple, with occasional extra crew.

    Sailing wise she is quite stiff, very well mannered and always light on the helm. 5 or 6 knots is easily achieved in a decent breeze. Under the standard engine you can motor at 5 knots in most conditions.

    Prop pull to starboard going astern with the standard engine and fixed prop is significant! but can be used to advantage when you get used to it.

    The aft cabin is 'compact' but OK as long as you are moderately athletic, we use it and although I am 6' 2" we have no difficulty, and the stern hatch allows a good view and lots of ventilation. In fact the whole boat is well ventilated with the three deck hatches and forehatch.

    As you can tell I am an enthusiastic owner. I also know M27's well, they are also excellent family sailers with a more traditional cabin layout and hull form. Is the 28 worth the extra? In my opinion yes, if you can find one, they are few and far between only about 25 are left in the UK, there are far more M27's around.

    If you want to know more happy to talk.

    All the best

    Colin
     
  6. Bob Herbert

    Bob Herbert Bob Herbert

    Messages:
    199
    Boat name:
    SWOOSH
    Berth:
    Walton Blackwaters
    Boat type:
    Moody 28
    Cruising area:
    East Coast
    Ian, hi
    I have a fin M28.
    Things to look for as any boat will be old are:
    Stern gland, could still be the old "packed gland" type. It can be changed very easily with a dripless one.
    The engine is replacement being a Yanmar, so no worries there, the engine mounts should be in good condition too.
    Keel bolts may look rusty and you will need to lift the floor boards to see them all. Don't be misled, they are mild steel for a reason, easily taken out and cleaned up one by one.
    You have to lift the table to get to the forward floor boards, if you do take them up check where the compression post attaches to the hull, it will probably be rusty and there may be some superficial cracks to the fibreglass support, don't be worried by them as long as the hull sounds solid when you tap it they can be glassed over.
    Check the forward edge of the keel, especially the keel hull joint, if it has taken a whack in the past check for any gaps or movement.
    The keel itself is iron, easy to repair any rust pits/patches.
    If you really want to get into detail, then behind the wooden paneling in the cabin where the stay anchor points come thru the deck can develop leaks, check around the anchor points on deck for excessive cracks.
    The electrics unless it has been upgraded is usually a mess behind the switch panel but easily sorted.
    The hatches are Lewmar and although the Acrylic can be replaced it is a bit expensive. As long as they don't leak then you can ignore the crazing.
    Cabin linings, if they haven't been replaced in the past and they are original may be starting to come unstuck, check inside the lockers and give a gentle tug on any corners.
    The gas piping to the cooker takes a bit of a tortuous route so make sure it is pressure tested for leaks.
    I've had my 28 for 10 years and found it very easy to sail single handed the accommodation is adequate for a 28 footer, personally i think they are better laid out than the 27's.
    If you didn't like the look of the one you saw today there's another on the market on the east coast!!
    Best regards
    Bob Herbert