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  1. Nelson Mower

    Nelson Mower Nelson Mower Registered Guest

    Messages:
    3
    Hello,

    My wife and I are considering purchasing a 2000 Moody 46. I would like to know if other owners are satisfied with the sailing performance and build quality of their 46's.

    I know it's a heavy displacement boat with fairly low SA/D ratio but that doesn't always tell the story. The boat seems very sound and well put together and maintained.

    Thank you.
     
  2. Peter Sims

    Peter Sims Peter Sims

    Messages:
    326
    Boat name:
    SIRI
    Berth:
    Ocean Quay Marina, Southampton
    Boat type:
    Moody 44
    Cruising area:
    Ionian
    Hi Nelson
    Since no 46 owners yet I will comment on my M44 in case it is useful. I've just come to the end of my first season with a 1997 M44 and am delighted with it. Fairly gentle sailing here in Greece but it is quick and responsive and a joy to sail. Maybe not as quick as a modern light displacement boat but certainly mademe happy!
    Hopefully a 46 owner will be along to comment soon
    Regards
    Peter
     
  3. Nelson Mower

    Nelson Mower Nelson Mower Registered Guest

    Messages:
    3
    Hello Peter,

    Thank you so much, I appreciate your reply. After doing more research we have made an offer on the 46. Still interested in any and all comments.

    Nelson
     
  4. Michael Barrett

    Michael Barrett Michael Barrett

    Messages:
    187
    Boat name:
    WHITE STAR
    Berth:
    Fishing Bay Harbor Marina
    Boat type:
    Moody 46
    Cruising area:
    Chesapeake Bay, Usa
    Have not tuned in to the MOA for a while. Sorry. Hope you got the boat.

    I have a 2000 M46. Excellent boat. I believe the boats were made by Marine Projects (MPP) under contract for Moody. MPP now Princess Yachts. Big power boats.

    The M46 had rudder seal issues. Tended to show up only when the boat was under way because the top of the stern tube was above the water line when the boat was at rest, but underway (especially under power), the stern would squat down and water would enter. Search the technical library for an article by George Dymond (previous owner of my boat) on this topic. The OEM seals (Lewmar? not sure) were bad and MPP repaired the ones brought to its attention without cost to the owner. In the case of my boat, this meant flying a technician in 2006 to the USA! That is service. Check to see if yours have been replaced. IF not, or you are suspicious, contact Walt Drechsler (a member of the MOA) for advice. He just did his. That is the only thing I know of that was a malady common to the M46. Otherwise, you need to look at the other things typical for a boat of its age: rigging and steering cables as these are getting age on them. Some owners have had concern over teak decks and leaking, but MPP glued the teak for the most part. Only the outer edges were screwed down, and there is potential for leakage where the screws are. Does not seem to be a problem on any M46 I know of. A universal problem, however, is the teak seating in the cockpit. It is a glued-in veneer. The drains are poorly designed--you will see a limber hole on each side above the teak seating towards the rear of your cockpit seats. The hole is above the seats, so if water does come in, it will drain to that level then pool. Over the years on most boats it has caused the teak veneer to fail and beg for replacement as it stains and de-laminates. There is a lot on this topic in the technical library--common to all Moodys. Like most owners, I replaced mine with real teak which can be sanded several times if necessary. The veneer teak was very thin. Your electronics may be way out of date, and if so, I'm sure you factored replacement into the purchase price.

    The boat came with standard JABSCO heads to which my wife simply said, "I don't pump," so my first task was to replace them with JABSCO electric heads. Not a difficult job, and the boat is pre-wired. Contact me and I'll tell you where the wiring is.

    I have an autoprop and bowthruster, and I have found the boat backs well--it goes where you steer it! She steers well at any speed. The prop is slightly offset to allow easy removal of the prop and shaft given that the boat has a skeg. Underway the rudder must be slightly trimmed to allow for the offset, but it does not seem to add drag or affect diesel mileage. You can see the offset if your autopilot shows rudder angle. At 15 tons, the M46 has a lot of momentum and if you have an autoprop or maxprop be advised that there is little or no drag when you back off the throttle when maneuvering in tight places like a marina. Give yourself lots of room or be prepared to put her in reverse and add a lot of throttle to slow her. The boat is a comfortable sailor in moderate to heavy weather. Comes alive at 15 knots and up. Over 20 roll in the main just slightly to take off pressure on the helm and to let her stand straight. Between 25-30 I'll often furl the Yankee and use the staysail and main. Comfortable and dry in the cockpit. Many owners say that flying the staysail helps to tack the Yankee. I have not noticed a difference.

    If your boat has been well maintained, outside of the rudder seal and the poorly located cockpit limber holes (above the seats), I can think of no other inherent flaws.

    Oh--forgot. A common problem is the holding tank gauge. USA boats have holding tanks with WEMA gauges that consist of a rubber float that slides up and down in a stainless steel barrel inside the tank, measuring the contents. Over the winter after pumping out for the season and letting things dry out, I'll open the tank and clean the barrel, but that lasts about a week once effluent gets in. It is not a good design, and there is little one can do to fix it. I'd like to put those strips on the tank that measure contents by electrical capacitance, but the tank is stainless, ruling out that possibility. So--you'll have to devise a schedule for pump out (if necessary) based on experience.

    Also, keep the stern lazarette locker lids dogged down tight when not open. There is a lip around each lazaretrte with two drain scuppers on it. The deck is designed to drain into these scuppers (rain or sea water) but the scupper inlets will clog easily from debris. In my case pine needles from trees around the marina. IF they clog, the water will overflow the lip and go into the bilge via the floor of the aft cabin, which can dampen the carpeting. You don't want that. Keep the scuppers clean!

    Boat sails well. She is stiff and responsive and comfortable with lots of room. We love ours. Tom Saxe has taken his from North Carolina to the Caribbean for the last several years. Crew of two. No issues.

    Feel free to ask any questions.

    Michael Barrett
     
  5. Nelson Mower

    Nelson Mower Nelson Mower Registered Guest

    Messages:
    3
    Mr. Barrett,

    Thank you for sharing your knowledge and experience, it is most helpful. We are still in the search process but these boats seem to fit the bill nicely. I hope we can make a deal on one soon.

    Nelson