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Moody 54 Moody 54 as first boat?

Ruth Narramore

Ruth Narramore
Registered Guest
#1
Hi. My hubby & I have decided to stop prevaricating and get on with our lives! We are looking at buying a Moody 54 as our first and hopefully only boat & intend to sail her following the trade winds around the world and also use her as a live aboard whilst we train and prepare for long crossings
Just looking for advice, comments from other 54 owners (& all moody owners) as to potential problem areas to look out for. We are both able diy’ers having worked on various land based properties over the years as well as maintaining cars etc but would appreciate some advance knowledge of problem areas on a vessel
Thank you in advance
 

Peter Sims

Peter Sims
Boat name
SIRI
Berth
Ocean Quay Marina, Southampton
Boat type
Moody 44
Cruising area
Ionian
#2
Hi Ruth
I'll be the first to jump in here. I know nothing about the 54 so can give no advice there other than what you get with other boats - something you don't know about of course.
10 days ago I met a nice couple who had just bought an Oyster 56 as their first boat with exactly the same intentions as you. I met them by chance having heard about them from their surveyor a week earlier. Lovely people with great ambitions and absolutely no idea of what they were taking on. Having met their surveyor I knew the boat was in good general order but, being 2nd hand, had some relatively minor issues. They had no idea what those issues meant and were managing to gloss over them as irrelevant. They were charmingly naïve and one would smile about it if they weren't about to go into my sailing area in 26 tons of boat with no experience other than a couple of weeks of courses on much smaller boats.
You may get the impression I disapprove strongly - and you would be right. I admire your courage, ambition, and your intent and I envy your ability to buy such a big boat. Being a grumpy old man, however, I think you are completely mad - in the nicest possible way. Even if you don't damage yourself or others you will probably damage the boat and other boats. You would be far more sensible to buy a much smaller boat for a year or 2 and get a little experience of what owning and maintaining a boat entails. They are complex pieces of equipment that few of us can claim to fully understand even after many years of ownership.
As the surveyor mentioned above said to the Oyster 56 owners, "What are you going to do if you are coming into a marina and the engine fails?" Their reply was "Turn round". His response was "No, that is not an option. You look for the cheapest boat to hit. Whatever you hit is going to be completely destroyed so make it as low cost as possible". They were horrified. He was absolutely right!
Whatever you decide I wish you well but please stay away from Greece for your first 2 or 3 years if you decide to plunge in at the 54' level.
Hopefully this will encourage others to come in with more positive advice!
Regards, and sorry to be so negative
Peter
 

Ruth Narramore

Ruth Narramore
Registered Guest
#3
Hi Ruth
I'll be the first to jump in here. I know nothing about the 54 so can give no advice there other than what you get with other boats - something you don't know about of course.
10 days ago I met a nice couple who had just bought an Oyster 56 as their first boat with exactly the same intentions as you. I met them by chance having heard about them from their surveyor a week earlier. Lovely people with great ambitions and absolutely no idea of what they were taking on. Having met their surveyor I knew the boat was in good general order but, being 2nd hand, had some relatively minor issues. They had no idea what those issues meant and were managing to gloss over them as irrelevant. They were charmingly naïve and one would smile about it if they weren't about to go into my sailing area in 26 tons of boat with no experience other than a couple of weeks of courses on much smaller boats.
You may get the impression I disapprove strongly - and you would be right. I admire your courage, ambition, and your intent and I envy your ability to buy such a big boat. Being a grumpy old man, however, I think you are completely mad - in the nicest possible way. Even if you don't damage yourself or others you will probably damage the boat and other boats. You would be far more sensible to buy a much smaller boat for a year or 2 and get a little experience of what owning and maintaining a boat entails. They are complex pieces of equipment that few of us can claim to fully understand even after many years of ownership.
As the surveyor mentioned above said to the Oyster 56 owners, "What are you going to do if you are coming into a marina and the engine fails?" Their reply was "Turn round". His response was "No, that is not an option. You look for the cheapest boat to hit. Whatever you hit is going to be completely destroyed so make it as low cost as possible". They were horrified. He was absolutely right!
Whatever you decide I wish you well but please stay away from Greece for your first 2 or 3 years if you decide to plunge in at the 54' level.
Hopefully this will encourage others to come in with more positive advice!
Regards, and sorry to be so negative
Peter
Hi Peter
Thank you for your reply and I fully take on board what you are saying. I should have said that we do have experience sailing on 38-40 ft boats, we have also completed training to Day Skipper level and are looking to gain more experience before taking the plunge. We have also been lucky enough to have had a wide variety of skippers/tutors who have not only given us RYA training in Tenerife and the Solent (as well as much tidal experience in the Bristol Channel in a RIB) but have also equipped us with hints and tips on short handed sailing. We are not going into this totally blind!

We are also reading as much as possible about boat maintenance & what can go wrong both with the boat and us! I am in no way saying that we know even a fraction of what is required but suffice to say we are more than willing to take advice and learn

I fully take on board your comments and appreciate the spirit in which they have been given and will practice engine failure manoeuvres as well as much more. Any advice is welcome whether negative or positive

Kind Regards
Ruth
 

Sean Tyson

Sean Tyson
Boat name
POLIBRE
Berth
Barrow In Furness
Boat type
Moody 31 MkII
Cruising area
Irish Sea
#4
Life isn't a dress rehearsal, get It bought and go and learn as you go. what a fantastic position to be in, well jell!!
You can always sell it if it does not work out, what could possibly go wrong....
 

Ruth Narramore

Ruth Narramore
Registered Guest
#5
Life isn't a dress rehearsal, get It bought and go and learn as you go. what a fantastic position to be in, well jell!!
You can always sell it if it does not work out, what could possibly go wrong....
Hi Sean. This is so true although I think a bit of tuition first makes life safer!
How long have you had your Moody? Do you enjoy it and have you found any problems or niggles?
Ruth
 

Alan King

Alan King
Boat name
ANADYR
Berth
La Roche Bernard
Boat type
Moody 346
Cruising area
West Country / Brittany
#6
The beauty of this website is that somebody has always done it before.
https://mariadz.com/category/mariadz-refit/
I found this by doing a search in info exchange using tag Moody 54.
Think that you have clarified 'first boat' and not 'first experience of sailing'.
Good luck,
Alan K
 

Steve Howlett

Steve Howlett
Boat name
TIGGER
Berth
Great Wakering, Essex
Boat type
Moody 27
Cruising area
River Crouch / River Roach / Thames Estuary
#8
Follow your dreams - where would we all be if our ancestors had not taken their first brave steps towards the edge of the horizon!
 
Boat name
APRIL LASS
Berth
Gosport
Boat type
Moody 31 MkII
Cruising area
Solent
#10
Ruth, there is a M54 just departing for Greenland in the next couple of weeks. Just wish I could take the time off to go with him. The cored hull will certainly help keep the hull warm, dry from condensation and quiet. The same will apply to boat in the tropics, the cored hull will help keep the boat cool.

http://www.cruisersforum.com/forums/f33/greenland-east-coast-196504.html
 
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