Moody 37 Pre purchase things to look at

Dominic Dobson

Dominic Dobson
Member
Boat name
RAMBLER
Berth
Gourock
Boat type
Moody 37
Cruising area
Clyde
#1
What are the common things to look out for when purchasing a 37? Should I be concerned with the original engine
 

Peter Brook

Peter Brook
Member
Boat name
CARMEN
Berth
Shotley Marina
Boat type
Moody 376
Cruising area
East Coast
#2
I have a Moody 376 (1990) which replaced the 37, but is much the same apart from the transom sugar scoop. Significant items on purchase (survey and ownership). I have posted some of my experiences on this site, and if you message me via pm/email, I can pass on the full survey report pre-purchase.

1. Sealing of shroud plate covers and possible water ingress to shroud plate attachment below deck. Mine were fine (I have sealed the shroud plate covers since purchase though). On Carmen, there is a substantial glass rib (probably with a ply core) that I managed to inspect whilst replacing the headlining. Over-engineered maybe, but one off my checklist.

2. Similar issue with mounting of inner forestay.

3. Headlining. Several areas of my headlining are no longer fixed 100% to the underlying structure. The foam backing deteriorates over time. This is apparent, but acceptable in the fore and aft cabins, but was not satisfactory on the sides of the main cabin. I have replaced the original headlining there with 5mm closed cell foam (more durable) and non-foam backed headlining. If is quite a job though.

4. Portlights. Most of the portlights in the saloon were leaking despite many attempts at resealing by the previous owner. I replaced all 6 with new units.

5. Electrical system. Certainly Carmen would benefit from a thorough inspection and revamp of the electrical system. Partly a result of the age of her with additions over the years, and partly due to the complexity of the systems. 2 heads, 2 showers, hot and cold water supplies etc.

6. Navigation equipment and electronic. Some of my navigation equipment/electronics was original with the yacht. Some added. As well as factoring in any necessary upgrades, expect high installation costs to route the connections.

7. Anchor locker. This drains via the main bilge. Not altogether an ideal arrangement.

8. Autopilot. The 4000 was original equipment. Mine probably is on it's last legs!

9. Engine. I can't help with this. My original was replaced in 2004. I don't think though that the Thornycroft has a fantastic reputation, so check it carefully would be my advice.

10. Keel bolts. These are galvanised, and access for the rear ones is difficult. They frequently show surface corrosion. Some owners have removed for inspection (from my reading of forums), but in the most part, they seem to be satisfactory

All this might seem negative, but you will find a similar, if not longer list on other yachts the same age. I have zero regrets over the purchase. She sails beautifully. Is not unsettled with rough conditions. After replacing the portlights, she is pretty much dry bilged except for condensation, and for some reason (probably leaking filler pipe) on replenishing the water. But even this is minimal. Mine was originally a Sea School yacht I believe, but shows surprisingly little wear and tear. Topsides and deck gelcoat in fantastic condition for the age. In my limited experience, they are great to live with, the interior is a nice place to be. I prefer the security of a centre cockpit sailing with my 9 year old son. They do take a bit of getting used to with marina handling and have a highish freeboard when getting on and off.
 

Dominic Dobson

Dominic Dobson
Member
Boat name
RAMBLER
Berth
Gourock
Boat type
Moody 37
Cruising area
Clyde
#3
Thanks Peter I'll pm you if I can work out how to do it, looking to up size from a Fairey Atalanta 26 so am used to running maintenance the other half wants more comfort and I like the centre cockpit arrangement with separate sleeping and living space so the 37/376 seems to fit the bill
 

Bill Hodgkinson

Bill Hodgkinson
Member
Boat name
ISOSCELES
Berth
Poole
Boat type
Moody 37
Cruising area
South Coast / Solent
#4
Hi Dominic,

That's a pretty good list from Peter. The bit I'd add to it is have a look at the steering cables. If they have a red outer sheathing they are original, if blue they have been replaced. You can replace the core cable which I have done after we suffered a snapped cable (it had come a little loose and got caught around the steering quadrant). Of course replacing the whole cable would no doubt be better.

Isosceles still has the original 30 year old Thornycroft and it's running ok, we are however considering a re-engine in a few years time when I retire.

The 37 is a lovely boat, feels very comfortable both in harbor and out sailing. Your requirements sound similar to where we started, and I've had no regrets with the 37.

Bill
 

Dominic Dobson

Dominic Dobson
Member
Boat name
RAMBLER
Berth
Gourock
Boat type
Moody 37
Cruising area
Clyde
#5
Thanks Bill good to have such quick response definite advantage of buying boat with active owners association
 

Dominic Dobson

Dominic Dobson
Member
Boat name
RAMBLER
Berth
Gourock
Boat type
Moody 37
Cruising area
Clyde
#6
Peter Brook cannot work out how to PM perhaps need full membership I can be contacted at dominicdobson@btinternet.com
I have a Moody 376 (1990) which replaced the 37, but is much the same apart from the transom sugar scoop. Significant items on purchase (survey and ownership). I have posted some of my experiences on this site, and if you message me via pm/email, I can pass on the full survey report pre-purchase.

1. Sealing of shroud plate covers and possible water ingress to shroud plate attachment below deck. Mine were fine (I have sealed the shroud plate covers since purchase though). On Carmen, there is a substantial glass rib (probably with a ply core) that I managed to inspect whilst replacing the headlining. Over-engineered maybe, but one off my checklist.

2. Similar issue with mounting of inner forestay.

3. Headlining. Several areas of my headlining are no longer fixed 100% to the underlying structure. The foam backing deteriorates over time. This is apparent, but acceptable in the fore and aft cabins, but was not satisfactory on the sides of the main cabin. I have replaced the original headlining there with 5mm closed cell foam (more durable) and non-foam backed headlining. If is quite a job though.

4. Portlights. Most of the portlights in the saloon were leaking despite many attempts at resealing by the previous owner. I replaced all 6 with new units.

5. Electrical system. Certainly Carmen would benefit from a thorough inspection and revamp of the electrical system. Partly a result of the age of her with additions over the years, and partly due to the complexity of the systems. 2 heads, 2 showers, hot and cold water supplies etc.

6. Navigation equipment and electronic. Some of my navigation equipment/electronics was original with the yacht. Some added. As well as factoring in any necessary upgrades, expect high installation costs to route the connections.

7. Anchor locker. This drains via the main bilge. Not altogether an ideal arrangement.

8. Autopilot. The 4000 was original equipment. Mine probably is on it's last legs!

9. Engine. I can't help with this. My original was replaced in 2004. I don't think though that the Thornycroft has a fantastic reputation, so check it carefully would be my advice.

10. Keel bolts. These are galvanised, and access for the rear ones is difficult. They frequently show surface corrosion. Some owners have removed for inspection (from my reading of forums), but in the most part, they seem to be satisfactory

All this might seem negative, but you will find a similar, if not longer list on other yachts the same age. I have zero regrets over the purchase. She sails beautifully. Is not unsettled with rough conditions. After replacing the portlights, she is pretty much dry bilged except for condensation, and for some reason (probably leaking filler pipe) on replenishing the water. But even this is minimal. Mine was originally a Sea School yacht I believe, but shows surprisingly little wear and tear. Topsides and deck gelcoat in fantastic condition for the age. In my limited experience, they are great to live with, the interior is a nice place to be. I prefer the security of a centre cockpit sailing with my 9 year old son. They do take a bit of getting used to with marina handling and have a highish freeboard when getting on and off.
Peter Brook cannot work out how to PM perhaps need full membership I can be contacted at dominicdobson@btinternet.com
 

Roy Clare

Roy Clare
Member
Boat name
OCEAN DANCER
Berth
Tollesbury
Boat type
Moody 376
Cruising area
UK
#7
What are the common things to look out for when purchasing a 37? Should I be concerned with the original engine
Hi there ... maybe too late for your purposes, but my tuppence for what it’s worth:
1. The list that has been posted is a good start.
2. As someone else has posted, take a look at the mast support column within the boat. Mine was fine.
3. To cure water leaks in the windows - reluctant to buy new frames - I applied a narrow bead of silicone sealant around the external joint between the Perspex and the frames (carefully masking the area so that a straightedge is achieved). I have had no leaks ever since.
4. The previous owner of Ocean Dancer elected to remove the engine, inspect and maintain it and then reinstall it about three years ago. So the boat has the original Thornycroft T80, a well-designed, heavy piece of machinery that was designed to last. Run conservatively it is not under stress. I change the oil more frequently than the manufacturer recommends (after 50 hours, instead of 100 hours). If the engine starts and the boat moves, you’ve probably got a plant that will do some hours yet.
5. For reasons unconnected with any concerns about build quality, but to repair keel stub damage caused when the previous owner grounded the boat, I have had 9 of the 11 keelbolts withdrawn for inspection. There were no issues with any of them. I’m planning to examine the remaining 2 later this year, when I will drain the fuel tank and move it up/forward to give access to them.
6. My wife and I love the boat. Steady as many vessels 20 feet longer, the 376 has copious accommodation and is fabulous for a couple to live-aboard; we think of the boat as a cruising cottage - a ‘second home’. Of course you need a Force 5 to get the boat shifting, but if you’re not too much in a hurry you’ll be rewarded with an excellent experience.
7. There’s always something to maintain on a boat of this size and type, so be prepared to run a to-do list, but average annual upkeep costs haven’t been exceptional.
8. We’ve never regretted the purchase.
Hope that’s helpful, good luck,
Roy
 

Dominic Dobson

Dominic Dobson
Member
Boat name
RAMBLER
Berth
Gourock
Boat type
Moody 37
Cruising area
Clyde
#8
Hi there ... maybe too late for your purposes, but my tuppence for what it’s worth:
1. The list that has been posted is a good start.
2. As someone else has posted, take a look at the mast support column within the boat. Mine was fine.
3. To cure water leaks in the windows - reluctant to buy new frames - I applied a narrow bead of silicone sealant around the external joint between the Perspex and the frames (carefully masking the area so that a straightedge is achieved). I have had no leaks ever since.
4. The previous owner of Ocean Dancer elected to remove the engine, inspect and maintain it and then reinstall it about three years ago. So the boat has the original Thornycroft T80, a well-designed, heavy piece of machinery that was designed to last. Run conservatively it is not under stress. I change the oil more frequently than the manufacturer recommends (after 50 hours, instead of 100 hours). If the engine starts and the boat moves, you’ve probably got a plant that will do some hours yet.
5. For reasons unconnected with any concerns about build quality, but to repair keel stub damage caused when the previous owner grounded the boat, I have had 9 of the 11 keelbolts withdrawn for inspection. There were no issues with any of them. I’m planning to examine the remaining 2 later this year, when I will drain the fuel tank and move it up/forward to give access to them.
6. My wife and I love the boat. Steady as many vessels 20 feet longer, the 376 has copious accommodation and is fabulous for a couple to live-aboard; we think of the boat as a cruising cottage - a ‘second home’. Of course you need a Force 5 to get the boat shifting, but if you’re not too much in a hurry you’ll be rewarded with an excellent experience.
7. There’s always something to maintain on a boat of this size and type, so be prepared to run a to-do list, but average annual upkeep costs haven’t been exceptional.
8. We’ve never regretted the purchase.
Hope that’s helpful, good luck,
Roy
Thanks Roy all helps to increase my knowledge looked at Boat today where I noted that the forward babystay has lifted the deck looks like some water ingress (have posted picture in another thread) do you know if this is a common fault and how to fix if it is.

Thanks
Dom
 

Roy Clare

Roy Clare
Member
Boat name
OCEAN DANCER
Berth
Tollesbury
Boat type
Moody 376
Cruising area
UK
#9
Thanks Roy all helps to increase my knowledge looked at Boat today where I noted that the forward babystay has lifted the deck looks like some water ingress (have posted picture in another thread) do you know if this is a common fault and how to fix if it is.

Thanks
Dom
Hi there, not a problem on my boat. The surveyor looked carefully at it (and all chain plates, for which panel access was created professionally by a yard at the previous owner’s cost) when I purchased the vessel two years ago. No issues found. My impression is that the baby stay anchorage is more an issue with the 346, but that’s hearsay. Others on this forum may well know better. If it is indeed an issue in the 376 you are considering, the headlining in the fwd heads and in the lobby between the fwd heads and the hanging cupboard would need to be dropped for inspection and repairs. To my eye, the anchorage does not coincide with an internal bulkhead. Roy
 

Dominic Dobson

Dominic Dobson
Member
Boat name
RAMBLER
Berth
Gourock
Boat type
Moody 37
Cruising area
Clyde
#10
Hi there, not a problem on my boat. The surveyor looked carefully at it (and all chain plates, for which panel access was created professionally by a yard at the previous owner’s cost) when I purchased the vessel two years ago. No issues found. My impression is that the baby stay anchorage is more an issue with the 346, but that’s hearsay. Others on this forum may well know better. If it is indeed an issue in the 376 you are considering, the headlining in the fwd heads and in the lobby between the fwd heads and the hanging cupboard would need to be dropped for inspection and repairs. To my eye, the anchorage does not coincide with an internal bulkhead. Roy
Thanks Roy
I came to the same conclusion re how to access there appeared to be a gap through which a pen could be inserted between the deck and the internal bulkhead that contained the door to the heads
 
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