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Refit Budget For An Early 80s Moody?

Rob Whelton

Rob Whelton
Registered Guest
#1
I'm looking ahead a few years, planning to take the family on a multi year cruise- certainly as far as Iberia and ideally the Caribbean. We currently sail a traditional 33ft boat from the 70s but are tempted to trade up to something more substantial. A centre cockpit Moody, perhaps a 37, is the sort of thing we are considering.

Obviously these are now quite old boats and will be getting tired. So what sort of refit work should we be factoring in? Standing rigging, keel bolts, fuel tank, wiring, through hulls, etc? Anything specific to this era of Moody would be appreciated.

Many thanks
 

Jeff Williams

Jeff Williams
Boat name
KYRA
Berth
Plymouth
Boat type
Moody 346
Cruising area
South Coast
#2
Rob,
All of the items you mention are part of an ongoing programme of maintenance on any boat (not just a Moody).
So it is the history and current condition of any potential purchase that is important.
Relavent questions of the owner when viewing a boat are important and of course to confirm the answers a purchase survey before finalising the purchase.
 

Rob Whelton

Rob Whelton
Registered Guest
#3
Thanks for that- as you say a lot of it will be down to the condition of the individual boat.
It would however be interesting to hear what owners have had to do to their Moodys over the years?
 

Peter Wright

Peter Wright
Boat name
WILD THYME
Berth
Suffolk Yacht Harbour
Boat type
Moody 425
Cruising area
North Sea, English Channel, Biscay
#4
Hi Rob,

The cost of a refit varies dramatically with the size of the yacht, her starting condition and the desired endpoint.

I know of a fair condition Moody 46 bought by a meticulous owner which is going trough a refit costing more than GBP 150,000, because of the standard of perfection the owner wants. By the end of the refit, she will be a much better boat than when new. Only you can decide on the standard that you wish to achieve and then the cost of getting there depends on the start condition and the extent to which you are willing and able to do the work yourself.

You don't mention replacing the engine, but this is probably a requirement on a boat as old as a Moody 37, if it hasn't already been done

It wont help you much, but I would guess that all the jobs you have listed on a 37 foot yacht plus a new engine, new sails, an instrument refit and reglaze or replace hatches and portlights (all things likely to need doing on a ~30 year old yacht ,if not done previously in its life) would come out between GBP30,000 and 50,000, if done by a yard. That's nothing to do with Moodys, it would apply to any yacht of that age and size.

With a Moody, unless she has been abused or poorly maintained, you will get a yacht in which the hull and deck mouldings are well built and a design which gives comfortable cruising and puts practicality for living aboard, both at sea and in harbour, above trendiness.

Peter.
 

Bill Hodgkinson

Bill Hodgkinson
Boat name
ISOSCELES
Berth
Poole
Boat type
Moody 37
Cruising area
South Coast / Solent
#5
Hi Rob, and welcome.

The 37 (and 376) is a great choice for long distance cruising, we bought Isosceles a year ago after a long search with exactly the same plans for 5 (or so) years time. Sheis a 1987 37 and sails well (I don't race, but friends who do are quite impressed with the performance), she is extreemly comfortable, both in harbour and out on the move.

We spent last year building a list of what needed doing, and what we wanted to do. I haven't priced it all up, and as others have said it is all dependent on the boat you find.

Re-rigging in one go would be around £4000, you can check the keel bolts yourself if you are practically minded, there is lots of info on here, this club is the best £20 I spent! I've checked the top end of our keel bolts but will pull some (or all) before we finally set off. The fuel tanks and thru hulls on ours are good, but will be constantly watched. I've been all over the wiring on Isosceles and all is good, except the wiring for the cockpit speakers (not original or tinned), but I'll be replacing the switch pannel in the spring (hopefully) as that is well past it's best .... 12volt sockets running variously off lighting and navigation equipment omongst other issues!!

We have an original Thornycroft 108 on Isosceles. We have had minor overheating issues, but using a flush on both the oil and the coolant, as well as replacing the coolant water inlet hose, seems to have cured that. I'm hoping to be able to remove the tube stack from the heat exchanger in the spring to make sure all is well there as an added precaution. Even then, I will think about replacing the engine before we throw off the lines long term.

We also want to re-insulate the fridge, as I doubt there is any worthwhile insulation left on there, add solar and update the sale wardrobe.

Also look at the steering, if the steering cables have a red outer casing then it may be close to replacement, the newer conduit has a blue outer casing. You can replace the inner cable (as I have done), but replacing the whole lot is a better option. And don't forget an emergency tiller for if things go wrong!

Good luck in your search, and fair winds!

Bill
 

Duncan Hall

Duncan Hall
Boat name
GOOSE
Berth
Mayflower, Plymouth
Boat type
Moody 42
Cruising area
South Coast
#6
I have done a partial refit on a Moody 42 so costs for a 37 should be less.


Spent about £25k.

The Major items were
£5k on engine and saildrive/propeller
£4.8k Rigging
£1.5k electrics inc batteries
£3k electronics
£1.6 replacement matresses
£2000 various shipwright work
£900 cockpit teak
£700 canvass



One key lesson is to use it a bit many bits of electronics that I thought were US were in fact needing rewiring as many junctions had succumbed to corrosion.


If you add in a new engine then you would be getting close to Peters suggestion.


Whilst I have had some professional help I have done a fair bit of the cosmetic, plumbing and electrical work myself.


It was worth shopping around for the major parts particularly the sails and the upholstery. Fortunately the water and fuel tanks seem OK


I would hasten to add that none of the above was a surprise as most work was identified by the surveyor and was allowed for in my offer.

Regards

Duncan
 

Rob Whelton

Rob Whelton
Registered Guest
#7
Useful information there, much appreciated.
Are your rigging costs for work done by a professional rigger? The last time I renewed standing rigging on my old 27ft boat it was only about 450 but I fitted it myself.

I've never had a boat with wheel steering- does this work with some sort of sheathed cable, like the ones that control the engine?
 

Paul Crickmore

Paul Crickmore
Boat name
JONIKA
Berth
Whitehaven
Boat type
Moody Eclipse 33
Cruising area
UK West Coast
#8
Hi, Rob.
Wheel steering works on one of few different systems. On my Eclipse 33 I have two of the common ones. From the pedestal, a rotating pole descends the centre of the pedestal from the wheel hub and is attached to a swinging arm that links to a bar attached to the steering quadrant. The inner helm position has a chain drive that pulls on sheathed cables whose ends wrap around the steering quadrant and pull on it. These cables appear very much like the throttle cables that control the engine, I think (never seen mine, they are well buried). 'Normal' boats have one or the other, plus a way of attaching an emergency tiller to the top of the pole coming out of the rudder stock.
ps, the 'quadrant' is a quarter circle of metal about 25cm wide that is bolted to the rudder stock to give the cables/bars something to pull on. Tiller-steered boats don't have one. The technical library probably has documents detailing the subject but I think you have to be a full member to access it.

Also, do check the condition of the framework under the chainplates. (Shoulders?) In some Moodys they rot from water ingress, meaning the chainplates pull up through the deck. I imagine this is very expensive to repair...

Best of luck, you won't regret buying a Moody!
 

Duncan Hall

Duncan Hall
Boat name
GOOSE
Berth
Mayflower, Plymouth
Boat type
Moody 42
Cruising area
South Coast
#9
Useful information there, much appreciated.
Are your rigging costs for work done by a professional rigger? The last time I renewed standing rigging on my old 27ft boat it was only about 450 but I fitted it myself.

I've never had a boat with wheel steering- does this work with some sort of sheathed cable, like the ones that control the engine?
The cost was for a professional rigger.

Looking at the invoice in detail it did include changing 2 halyards and several light fittings and other bits and bobs but in any event most would do that anyway when the mast was down.

Standing Rigging parts alone was £2500 inc VAT.

I think Paul has answered your question re the wheel.

Regards

Duncan
 
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