Moody 35 Sailing newby is going to buy a Moody 35

  • Thread starter Jouni Turula
  • Start date
J

Jouni Turula

Hi all,
I found a Moody 35 in a good condition (and I think with a good price too). It is surveyed and there was couple of things that I am little bit concerned of.

First is rusty keel bolts. The surveyors opinion was that they are not in need of replacement yet, but should be closely monitored. Any advice on how to protect or preserve them (if it is possible)? And how to know when they are worse enough to be replaced?

Secondly, on starboard side deck, in vicinity of a chainplate, surveyor found slightly raised moisture levels on small area. Im not sure how accurate these devices are that are used to measure it, but it showed something. Again surveyors opinion was, that no actions are required, but nees to be monitored. Any opinions on this?

Third one is that the boat has been docked since fall 2015 (Owners health reasons, age over 70 years). Now he decided to sell the boat. It is agreed that the boat will be launched, rigged and test sailed with current owner to check that everything is workin before money changes owner. Is there something special to look at when boat has been on land for so long?

Thanks in advance,
Jouni

I have experience on motorboats, but all is new with sailing. And yes, I will make an request for full membership on MOA ;)
 

Peter Wright

Peter Wright
Member
Boat name
WILD THYME
Berth
Suffolk Yacht Harbour
Boat type
Moody 425
Cruising area
North Sea, English Channel, Biscay
Hi Jouni and welcome to the MOA,

If you make a search on the Info Exchange part of this site, you will find many references to the two issues your surveyor has raised. The design of these features is common to all Moodys of that era, so the experience of other models, not just M35s is relevant. I'll try to summarise here, but reading up on this site will be time we'll spent.

Keel bolts (in fact they're studs, but we all call them bolts). Because of concerns about crevice corrosion of stainless steel in a chloride rich environment, Marine Projects used mild steel for the studs, backing plates and nuts to secure the keels on the sailboats they built. Now that this phenomenon is better understood, it is seen as much less likely at the moderate stress levels and low temperatures found in the conservatively designed Moody keel attachments. As a result, nearly all modern yacht builders use 316 stainless steel for this purpose, despite the fact that modern keel design gives higher stresses than the Moody design.

Because yacht bilges usually get some seawater in them (e.g. when drawing the log transducer for cleaning) the parts of these that you see in the bilge are usually rusty and this causes younger surveyors, brought up in the era of stainless, to recommend replacement - your surveyor seems more knowledgeable in recommending watching. The experience of many owners on replacing or drawing a stud for inspection is that the stud below the nut is shiny and new looking. The exceptions to this are when the mastic joint between the hull and keel has failed as this allows salt water access to the studs. The best way to check for failure of this joint is to watch her being put down on her keel after haul out - if the joint has failed, you will see water squeezing out as the weight comes on her keel.

Unless this joint has failed, or the nuts are so badly rusted that they're about to disintegrate, your surveyor's recommendation sounds good. The best way to protect your keel bolts is to clean them up (wire brush on a drill) and paint with at least 2 coats of a paint designed to deal with rust, preferably one containing zinc. Then you can join the rest of us seeking the Nirvana of a dry bilge.

Chain plates. The problem here is the little stainless plates screwed down around the chain plates to keep the water out. The sealant used to make them watertight dries out over the years so they start leaking as they age. Prevention is simple, lift them every few years, and rebed them in new sealant. Better still, chamfer the edges of the hole before rebedding them. Water ingress here damages the balsa core of the deck and the marine ply part bulkhead to which the chain plate is bolted. In extreme cases, the bolts can tear out of the soggy marine ply. The easy test for whether there are real problems with the chain plate is to put a straight edge on the deck around the little stainless plate - if you find a bulge, it's time to investigate further. Some folk consider the bolted joint (chain plate to part bulkhead) under designed - as an engineer, I believe it is adequately designed, provided the marine ply remains dry - it's not reasonable to expect a wooden component to deliver design strength when it's saturated with water.

The joint isn't easy to inspect because it's hidden behind the beautiful Moody cabinetry down below. Removing the cabinetry is fairly major work, so some use an endoscope, introduced through a small hole to inspect their chainplates, on Wild Thyme we cut decent sized holes for inspection, then covered them with offcuts from a teak decking job, which gives a good cosmetic finish but allows easy unscrewing for future inspections.

In your case, I would recommend doing the straight edge check, resealing the stainless cover plates and thinking about how you will inspect the chain plate boltind to the part bulkhead, but that's only urgent if you find a bulge in the deck.

I believe I'm right in thinking that the M35 has a baby stay rather than forward lower shrouds. If this is the case, it's worth doing a straight edge check around that chain plate sealing plate as well. To learn more about the issues there, do a search of the Info Exchange on "baby stay".

It seems to me that your surveyor has done a fair job and made good recommendations. Follow his advice and that that you find on this website and the Moody will bring you many years of delight.I believe the advice I have read from others on here has saved me a lot of money and hard work over the years, the modest subscription is a great investment.

Peter.
 
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Jouni Turula

Thank you Peter for a really good reply.
I will check the deck for the bilge you talked about. I think I undestood what you mean. (Im not a native english speaker, in case you didn't notice).

I would have looked this info from the info exchange, but Im still a guest member so no access to there yet. My full membership is still pending.
I think the price I got negotiated is a bargain so I was probably a bit too eager to take it. But the boat looked great inside and out, and the survey report was saying the same and we will do a test sail... so I couldn't resist.

Jouni
 

Peter Wright

Peter Wright
Member
Boat name
WILD THYME
Berth
Suffolk Yacht Harbour
Boat type
Moody 425
Cruising area
North Sea, English Channel, Biscay
Hola Jouni,

De tu nombre, creo que eres de origen Espanol. En Ingles, como en Castellano, los barcos llevan una idioma especial, entonces no es facil entender.

Not helped by my typos (now corrected) - you're looking for a bulge in the deck, not a bilge, sorry, I must get smaller fingers or a larger phone!!

You can join as a temporary member now for £20. When you buy your Moody, you can change that to full membership at no extra charge within the same year.

Peter
 
J

Jouni Turula

Tanks again, but spanish didnt help... Finnish might ;)
But, all is understood!
 

Peter Wright

Peter Wright
Member
Boat name
WILD THYME
Berth
Suffolk Yacht Harbour
Boat type
Moody 425
Cruising area
North Sea, English Channel, Biscay
Sorry, I have absolutely no Finnish. I was in Budapest last month and I understand that there is some relationship between Finnish and Hungarian, but I found that the Hungarians (like the Finns) all seem to speak very good English, so I learned little of their language.

What I wrote in Spanish was that English boats, like Spanish, have their own language so it's difficult. I really didn't detect from your first post that you are not a native English speaker, nor would I have picked it up from the subsequent ones, so you obviously follow that Finnish tradition of speaking very good English.

Hopethe Moody works out for you,

Peter.
 
J

Jouni Turula

Thanks Peter, I am doing my best. And sure the Moody is going to work. Beautiful center cockpit sailboat. Finnish made would be great too, but they are bit too expensive...
 
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