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Moody 47 (80s) Things to know before the survey?

Samuel Sam

samuel sam
Registered Guest
#1
Hello all

First post here, as I've currently made a successful offer on a 1984 Moody 47. I'm going to see the boat for the first time next weekend and if everything is to my liking, will proceed to the survey the day after. Any pointer on things to have a look at and be cautious about? I've found very little info on the Moody 47 so far on the web so any link/ressources or owners who would be willing to offer a bit of info would be GREATLY appreciated!

Thanks so much in advance
Sam
 

Peter Sims

Peter Sims
Boat name
SIRI
Berth
Ocean Quay Marina, Southampton
Boat type
Moody 44
Cruising area
Ionian
#2
Hi Sam
Your time frame seems very condensed so a few points to consider based on my recent purchase. I did look at 1 80's 47 but never put an offer in.
1. I hope your surveyor is someone you chose, not recommended by seller or broker. What experience of Moody's do they have or boats of this size?
2. Does she have teak decks? If so what condition is the teak in? There are many places you can measure it to see what is left and around deck fittings you can see how worn down it is. The boat I looked at had just had the teak removed and decks re-gelcoated. Pretty good job and much cheaper than new teak.
3. Take a camera with good magnification and get good picture all around the mast head, shrouds, spreaders, radar bracket etc. The surveyor will not go above deck level and all this will help with your insurance company - or a decision to replace standing rigging.
4. Poke into every locker and bilge access. Surveyor should do this as well but may help you to ask questions. In particular what are the keel studs/nuts/backing plates like. Does the bilge look as though it has been kept clean and dry?
5. Check all the batteries. If freshly charged switch the charger off and see how the voltage drops over the time you have.
6. If she's in the water how well does the engine start and run. Oil pressure, charging, temperature. Service history.
7. What is the wiring like. Does everything work. Does it look well maintained and additions well done or is it like many boats of that age - a mess.
8. What are the tanks like. Can you take a sample out of the diesel tank. Are water tanks clean.
9. Check through all the paperwork. Is it organised with manuals and invoices. Previous bills of sale. VAT evidence
10 Upholstery condition
11. Get as good a look at the sails as possible. Does furling gear work smoothly.
General condition of the boat will give you a good idea if it has been cared for but the more time you have to poke around and get a feel for it the better. Your surveyor will cover many of the points above and a lot more but the more you see the better equipped you are to ask pertinent questions. No doubt others will be along shortly with more / better points for you
Regards
Peter
 

Samuel Sam

samuel sam
Registered Guest
#3
Hi Peter

Thanks for your answer! Yes; the timeframe is very condensed; we're in Quebec city - Canada, where no real cruising boats are located really. So the boat is in Florida.. To answer your points:

1. I hope your surveyor is someone you chose, not recommended by seller or broker. What experience of Moody's do they have or boats of this size?
--> yes, we did choose the broker. But Moodys aren't that common in the US so he doesn't know the Moodys

2. Does she have teak decks? If so what condition is the teak in? There are many places you can measure it to see what is left and around deck fittings you can see how worn down it is. The boat I looked at had just had the teak removed and decks re-gelcoated. Pretty good job and much cheaper than new teak.
--> No teak deck. I don't know if the boat was factory ship with teak deck though; that's one the of the questions I have for the PO

3. Take a camera with good magnification and get good picture all around the mast head, shrouds, spreaders, radar bracket etc. The surveyor will not go above deck level and all this will help with your insurance company - or a decision to replace standing rigging.
--> Standing rigging has been replaced 4 years ago, including chain plate. Surveyor will go aloft to inspect mast, spreaders and so on.

4. Poke into every locker and bilge access. Surveyor should do this as well but may help you to ask questions. In particular what are the keel studs/nuts/backing plates like. Does the bilge look as though it has been kept clean and dry?
--> Yes. I plan to! My understanding is that the mast is deck-stepped, so I'm expecting a dry bilge. if it isn't clean, I will want to track where it's coming from. The boat has a centerboard, which is something I don't have first hand experience with.

5. Check all the batteries. If freshly charged switch the charger off and see how the voltage drops over the time you have.
--> yes! :)

6. If she's in the water how well does the engine start and run. Oil pressure, charging, temperature. Service history.
--> We're gonna do a sea trial with her. So engine at full regime, but also to inspect sails, test the autopilot and see how that in-mast furling system works out.

8. What are the tanks like. Can you take a sample out of the diesel tank. Are water tanks clean.
--> Are the tanks SS or integral fiberglass on the Moodys? Any known problem with them?

9. Check through all the paperwork. Is it organised with manuals and invoices. Previous bills of sale. VAT evidence
--> yes!

10 Upholstery condition
--> New 2014 (yay!)

11. Get as good a look at the sails as possible. Does furling gear work smoothly.
--> The boat has an hydrolic Lewmar Commander system that powers up furling systems (in-mast and genoa) + the primary winches. I don,t know if it's been retro-fitted in the boat or it was factory installed?

General condition of the boat will give you a good idea if it has been cared for but the more time you have to poke around and get a feel for it the better. Your surveyor will cover many of the points above and a lot more but the more you see the better equipped you are to ask pertinent questions. No doubt others will be along shortly with more / better points for you

Our current planning is to spend a full day on the boat poking at every system and opening everything. If everything checks out, than we will do a full day survey (4 hours in the boat, than short haul out to inspect hull + centerboard + rudder & pro/shaft) than a sea trial. we finish the day with rigging inspection + deck.

I guess I'm trying to know if there are some known problems with these boats that I should be aware of / connect with other owners?

Thanks
sam
 
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