Moody 36 (90s) 1997 Moody 36-2 joys / frustrations of ownership?

Charles Perkins

Charles Perkins
Registered Guest
Lovely looking boat with good space! Can anyone tell me about the joys and frustrations of ownership? Or similar Moodys. Esp:
1) Performance (she's kept in a light wind area)
2) 2nd hand problems. E.g. a 376 owner friend had probs with windows, electrics and windlass.
Thanks all!
 

Roy Clare

Roy Clare
Member
Boat name
OCEAN DANCER
Berth
Tollesbury
Boat type
Moody 376
Cruising area
UK
Hi there,
Moodys are vintage boats. Buy one and you’ve bought a lifestyle.
The joy of ownership is that you’d have a hull and design that are timeless; lots of space, as you note. And real development potential for the long haul. And the best owners’ web forum anywhere, to assist and advise and guide.
We love our 376. Curse her too, but mostly love .....
But ....
If you’re looking for a light airs flyer - avoid ... if you’re looking for zero upkeep - avoid.
Simples.
Good luck with decisons!
Roy
 

Charles Perkins

Charles Perkins
Registered Guest
Hi there,
Moodys are vintage boats. Buy one and you’ve bought a lifestyle.
The joy of ownership is that you’d have a hull and design that are timeless; lots of space, as you note. And real development potential for the long haul. And the best owners’ web forum anywhere, to assist and advise and guide.
We love our 376. Curse her too, but mostly love .....
But ....
If you’re looking for a light airs flyer - avoid ... if you’re looking for zero upkeep - avoid.
Simples.
Good luck with decisons!
Roy
Thx Roy! Appreciate the quick response.
Roughly what wind speed upwind would you put your first reef in on your 376?
And are you saying Moodys need more than other boats to keep up?
Cheers!
Charlie
 

Roy Clare

Roy Clare
Member
Boat name
OCEAN DANCER
Berth
Tollesbury
Boat type
Moody 376
Cruising area
UK
Hi Charlie,

The 376 stands up well with a full main, but in common with many boats of that generation the Genoa needs rolling to a “No1” Jib really early - 12 knots apparent; and “No2” by 18 knots apparent.

Full main (properly flattened) with a “No2” carries up to 20/22 knots apparent. Then a reef is desirable.

The main in Ocean Dancer is fully-battened, which I really like. With 3 reefs available, two from the cockpit, the third from the deck.

So it isn’t that the boat won’t stand her canvas, she will. But related to the sail power it’s a heavy boat. So our ideal breeze on all points of sail is in the range F4 to F6. Then there is a really wonderful feeling of power and stability.

Lighter airs can be a struggle! But we try not to be in a hurry. Which is therapeutic.

Hope that’s helpful?
 

Charles Perkins

Charles Perkins
Registered Guest
Roy that's helpful thanks.

If we had wind here it'd be an easy decision... I do really like the space and seaworthiness.

Cheers!




Hi Charlie,

The 376 stands up well with a full main, but in common with many boats of that generation the Genoa needs rolling to a “No1” Jib really early - 12 knots apparent; and “No2” by 18 knots apparent.

Full main (properly flattened) with a “No2” carries up to 20/22 knots apparent. Then a reef is desirable.

The main in Ocean Dancer is fully-battened, which I really like. With 3 reefs available, two from the cockpit, the third from the deck.

So it isn’t that the boat won’t stand her canvas, she will. But related to the sail power it’s a heavy boat. So our ideal breeze on all points of sail is in the range F4 to F6. Then there is a really wonderful feeling of power and stability.

Lighter airs can be a struggle! But we try not to be in a hurry. Which is therapeutic.

Hope that’s helpful?
 

Peter Wright

Peter Wright
Member
Boat name
WILD THYME
Berth
Suffolk Yacht Harbour
Boat type
Moody 425
Cruising area
North Sea, English Channel, Biscay
Hi Charlie,

I've never sailed a 90's Moody 36, but have owned a M425 for 10 years and have sailed a 90's M38 which differs little from Roy's M376. As Roy says, these boats sailing characteristics are classic examples of the IOR influenced masthead rig, with a relatively small main and a large overlapping genoa. However, my preferred approach to shortening sail, at least upwind, is trather different from Roy's.

I reckon both these boats will carry full sail happily up to 15 knots, if you get the sails flat, but beyond that they will feel more comfortable and speed up, if you reduce sail. Particularly upwind, I prefer to reef the main first, as the genoa is the power house in this rig. Even though Bill Dixon's hulls are exceptionally well balanced, weather helm inevitably increases with heel, so taking main off first also serves to reduce this by removing the aft most bit of sail area. Only after the first reef is in, do I look to wind in a bit of genoa at around 18 knots, and then not down to a no.1 jib size (i.e. no overlap) but rather to a no. 2 genoa size, that's the limit of my experience on a M38, but with our M425, I would then go to the equivalent of 2nd. reef in the main following this with reducing the genoa to no. 1 jib size, which she'll carry up to 28 knots if the sails are properly flattened, which is challenging with a genoa rolled up so much. Beyond that performance is out of the window and it's survival tactics.

These boats are not light airs flyers, and our M425 feels as though a switch operates at 10 knots of breeze - she suddenly comes alive as this windspeed is reached, but feels dull at lower windspeeds, not that she doesn't move, but she's much less responsive. As Roy writes, this is probably due to the considerable displacement of these designs, but that has the advantage of making them relatively insensitive to the weight of gear all us cruisers tend to load on board.

It's interesting to read how others approach this all important aspect of sailing.

The 1990's M36 is the next generation of Moodys to come off Bill Dixon's drawing board, fitst built in 1996, so hopefully an owner if one of these will be along soon to offer you their experience of that boat.

Peter.
 

Charles Perkins

Charles Perkins
Registered Guest
Thanks Peter. Reading between the lines, you and Roy are telling the same story with a different cover!
Is there anything unusual about your Moody ownership (good or bad) that you didn't expect? Extra costs or extra benefits?
Cheers!
Charlie
 

Peter Wright

Peter Wright
Member
Boat name
WILD THYME
Berth
Suffolk Yacht Harbour
Boat type
Moody 425
Cruising area
North Sea, English Channel, Biscay
Hi Charlie,,

Even the later M36 you're contemplating is still going to be 20 or more years old, and the downside of any boat of this age is that a lot of kit will be due for replacement. In terms of the boat's basic design, my main complant is that a lot of key equipment is hidden away inaccessibly behind beautiful Moody cabinetry, but we are gradually resolving that with equally beautiful teak access hatches to get at the chain plates and the nuts beneath the genoa sheet turning blocks.

Our M425 has ample space aboard for most purposes, but the same winderful cabinetry also leaves plenty of additional stirage space available which some owners have opened up with extra hatches. Whils we can comfortably fit 10 around the saloon table for a meal, the cockpit space is not so generous only really accomodating 4 round the table for a meal and 5 or 6 when sailing wigh the rable folded away. In fine weather, there are plenty of places to sit out of the cockpit, but this is less inviting when its p***ing with rain - we learn thisvthrough having 7 grandsons.

The joys of owning a Moody are too many to list, but she's a fine cruising design with a surprising turn of speed on passage and the wonderful balance for which Bill Dixon is recognised as a genius. An added bonus of owning a Moody is this wonderful Owners' Association, which must be the best of all, organising great events, on and off the water, and providing the help and advice found on these forums.

Peter.
 

Roy Clare

Roy Clare
Member
Boat name
OCEAN DANCER
Berth
Tollesbury
Boat type
Moody 376
Cruising area
UK
Thanks Peter. Reading between the lines, you and Roy are telling the same story with a different cover!
Is there anything unusual about your Moody ownership (good or bad) that you didn't expect? Extra costs or extra benefits?
Cheers!
Charlie
Hi Charlie, the surprises have been few. We knew we were buying a heavy displacement boat of an older design. The volume inside is fabulous; and the build quality speaks for itself - durable and rugged. There are very few known issues that affect the entire fleet. Obvs there are some ill-maintained examples around, but most by now are in a mature phase of their lives - long term get-wells and updates have been made or are being made.
These boats are for people who are comfortable to trundle and enjoy!
When I was deep into ocean racing (‘back in the day’) I’d not have looked twice at a Moody. Now I laugh as I realise how uncomfortable ocean racing was (is)!
Interested Peter keeps his Genoa longer than I do. That maybe because his sail is in better shape than mine. Once they age a bit and acquire a ‘belly’ (ha!) the large headsails need earlier reefing.
Good luck with your decision.
Roy
 

Stuart Wineberg

Stuart Wineberg
Member
Boat name
MOODY BLUE
Berth
Ocean Village
Boat type
Moody 36(90s)
Cruising area
Channel Coast
Ok, you asked. By the way my M36 is easily the best of the 10 or so vessels I have owned, just to give some perspective. Leaky transom windows. No sensible way for the pressure rise in the calorifier to be vented (fixable). Cooker and fridge should be in each other’s position (not fixable). There should be an opening window above the cooker. Terrible access for pipes and cables. Stupidly long run of hose from toilet to skin fitting. Leaky lazarette seals. Tendency for rudder post seals to fail (fixable)

However, magnificently seaworthy. Fabulously comfy aft cabin, great engine access, safe centre cockpit, loads of safe walkabout space on aft deck. Points much better than you would expect when you add a battened main. Love it.
 
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