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Non Boat Specific Moody 27 vs 29 Singlehanded

Stuart Pitches

Stuart Pitches
Registered Guest
Looking to buy my first yacht. Live in the SW so it will be a bilge keel for 15K or under.

Will probably sail solo for at least half the time.

My budget and research have led me to be looking at 27s, 28s & 29s. Ideally I would like a wheel and self tailing winches to make life easier for my wife. The winches seem possible but would need a 31 to get a wheel and wheeled 31s seem rare and too rich for me. Any comments?

So please, what differences would I find between the 27, 28 and 29? There just don't seem many 28s out there, I guess therre weren't that many built.

Thanks
 

Peter Wright

Peter Wright
Member
Boat name
WILD THYME
Berth
Suffolk Yacht Harbour
Boat type
Moody 425
Cruising area
North Sea, English Channel, Biscay
Hi Stuart,

As regards single handing, there will be little difference between these 3 boats, but I wonder why you are seeking a wheel steered version. Tiller steering on a boat this size gives better control imho and permits you to move around the cockpit much ore while maintaining control of the helm, particularly if you fit a tiller extension. The two things which present the greatest challenge to a single hander are picking up a mooring buoy and coming alongside a pontoon in a strong blow. In both cases, provided you prepare properly, the key is to get the boat secured before she blowsaway. With a tiller and extension, you can be in control with one hand over the side of the boat - no way of achieving that with a wheel!

The other thing that varies between these models is age. M27 built 1981 - 85, M28 built 1985 - 87 and M29 built 1980 - 83 so all between 33 and 40 years old, so the way they have been cared for will make more difference than age. The Moody 28 is really just a later model of the M27.

Self tailing winches is a good call for single handing, but I doubt whether any of these had them as of new - I guess quite a few will have fitted them subsequently, but hopefully some owners of these models will be along shortly to tell you. The other great aid for single handing is a decent autopilot.

Rather than first deciding which model you want, I would just look for the best condition one you can find.

Hope your search is fruitful,
 

Stuart Pitches

Stuart Pitches
Registered Guest
Thanks. I quite agree about the tiller / wheel issue.

It's not for me, as a dingy sailer I am used to either, but it would make life easier for my other half on the helm. She has only steered with a wheel up to now and I was hoping to keep things as familiar as poss. However it does look like it will not be possible. I have no doubt she can do it, just a little practise.
 

Giles Ford-Crush

Giles Ford-Crush
Member
Boat name
CRAZY DIAMOND
Berth
Fambridge
Boat type
Moody 30
Cruising area
East Anglia
My M30 has a wheel, and I single hand a great deal.

As Peter says, these older boats will be variable in terms of condition and specification.
 

Peter Wright

Peter Wright
Member
Boat name
WILD THYME
Berth
Suffolk Yacht Harbour
Boat type
Moody 425
Cruising area
North Sea, English Channel, Biscay
H Giles,

Wheel steering doesn't make single handing impossible but a tiller is definitely easier when coming alongside or picking up a mooring single handed - you can squat on the side deck holding a tiller extension in one hand.

Peter.
 

John Ranson

John Ranson
Member
Boat name
NAKITA
Berth
Felixstowe
Boat type
Moody 31 MkII
Cruising area
Deben
Hi Giles,

Completely agree with Peter on the tiller option. I often steer while standing on my Moody 31 with the tiller between my legs leaving both hands free for adjusting the sheets etc. Having a tiller also saves you having to climb over the seats to get behind the wheel. Just make sure you will have a tiller pilot and you are good to go.

John
 

Roger Davis

Roger Davis
Member
Boat name
HUNKY DORY
Berth
Newhaven
Boat type
Moody 29
Cruising area
South Coast
All the Moody's you mention are great sea boats and you will give up a long time before they do! Tillers in my experience are more sensitive than wheels, and a few seconds lack of concentration or looking around can send you well off course in a jiffy. On the plus side with practise they are incredibly manoeuvrable. My better half has never used a wheel but has become very competent with the tiller.

Ive sailed my M29 single handed with no problems for many years. What is essential, in my view, is a decent tiller pilot which is very simple to install. Ive got a ST 2000 which is more than capable of handling quite testing conditions. You need to be able to rely on the auto helm when trimming, fendering, dealing with problems or putting on the kettle. On long runs I tend to use it most of the time, it will manage a far better course than I can on channel crossings. It also works fine when tacking, managing the helm whilst I see to the sheets. Another plus is that it does what its told and doesn't answer back like some of my crew!!:) With the helm in good hands self tailing winches are nice to haves but not essential. I haven't any.

Single handed slipping is not a problem provided you plan for wind, tide etc. Coming alongside is probably the most stressful of single handing, but as said above - its all down to planning, rigging lines and having everything to hand - its no good searching for the boat hook when its too late!!

regards Roger - M29 Hunky Dory
 

Graham Allan

Graham Allan
Member
Boat name
SEA HOLLY
Berth
Portsmouth
Boat type
Moody 28
Cruising area
Solent
Sorry to come into this conversation so late.

I have a 1986 Moody 28 and over the last 5 years I have found her to be an excellent little boat. I often sail single handed, but also sail a lot with my wife, as others have said all 3 of these boats will be tiller, and have never found it a problem. The boats are very sea worthy, we have sailed from the east coast to the solent, and a couple of channel crossings. We mainly sail in the solent, and she is fine, even upto a F6, we have the furling mainsail, which although it has a 'personality' it gives unlimited reefing options making the boat safe and tiller light and easy to handle in any weather.

We looked at the M29s and saw some very clean examples, but coming from a Hunter Horizon 23 we found the Moody28 more modern inside, and love the sugar scoop for getting in and out of a tender, kayak or water after a swim. I looked at a few M28s and seem to remember all had self tailoring main winches for the headsail sheet. The smaller winches on the coach roof were not though. But we use the starboard one, once a year to hoist the Genoa, and the other gets light use for the furling main. The boat is light enough to steer with the tiller between my legs, whilst doing other jobs like storing fenders, or drinking a warm drink.

Our M28 was a good find, with new sails, sprayhood and habitent, recent new upholstery, water tank and diesel tank and mainly a fairly new Beta 20 engine.

I'm also surprised how well she sails, being bilge keel and furling mast, with the large genoa we easily see 6kts from her. It's a very solid and stable boat, not tippy like our Hunter was.
 
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